so it goes

awkwardsituationist:

photos by klaus echle, a forest ranger in germany’s black forest who came to gain the trust of this young female red fox. but after six months, at the start of the mating season, she disappeared. “i still miss seeing her,” he said. 

just-art:

Watercolor

by

Monica Loya

OnTumblr

moarrrmagazine:

Vegetabowls 
handmade ceramic bowls from New York

pleatedjeans:

via

joelzimmer:

Bright

Park Slope, Brooklyn

I

PAUL MARCUS FUOG


Salvador Dali, Summer.
Salvador Dali, Summer.
battybatty:

rhizomatous:

Coyote riding public rail in Portland, OR (via)


who took this picture of me

battybatty:

rhizomatous:

Coyote riding public rail in Portland, OR (via)

who took this picture of me

I dunno, just laying face down on the couch and waiting for some baby boomers to die, I guess
Millennials, when asked about plans for the future (via alwaysfaithfulterriblelizard)

artphotocollector:

"Nobody knows what art is, and it can’t be taught. It’s the mind and the talent of the eye of the individual, who is operating the machine, that produces what comes out of it."—Walker Evans

Some people can paint, others can’t. Some folks can sing, I cannot. And some individuals take great photographs, while others can only aspire. The Rome-based photographer, Giovanni Cocco, was unknown to me until last week. I stumbled upon his work online and in a moment, knew, this is a photographer with talent. Later, upon reviewing his portfolio online, my notion was duly confirmed.

Cocco’s work is diverse and strong. A quick survey of his portfolio and you’ll see, there’s a passionate eye behind the lens. Whether in color or black & white, shooting commercial or his own personal projects, this Italian photographer knows exactly what he’s doing with his machine. This selection from his “Burladies" series is but one distinct example of what he can do. Younger and ambitious photographers, in particular, should take note. This is how good you need to be—and it can’t be taught. —Lane Nevares

mrcleanrightbehindyou:

Exposed by The Postal Service

Yola Monakhov made homemade pinhole cameras out of boxes, loaded them with large format 4x5 color film, put a stamp on them, opened the shutter, and sent them through the mail. the results are these long exposures of the the cameras saw in transport and i’m absolutely in love.

website